Permafrost and cryogenic monitoring in the western Russian Arctic.

Permafrost is currently analysed by reviewing temperatures at different layers compared with air and ground surface temperatures, depth of freezing and thawing, as well as overall coverage including snow and vegetation. Mean annual air temperature (MAAT) and mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT) are a widely used source of analysis with the practical measurements being completed…

Green canopies in the urban Russian Arctic

The majority of residents in cities in the Russian Arctic are not indigenous to the area (approx 95%), mostly migrating from the south and west. They are not used to Arctic ecosystems and the Arctic climate with lower temperatures, permafrost, less rich soil and having to adapt to differing light with polar days and nights….

Building a national permafrost picture benefits everyone

Up until now, multiple institutions across Russia monitor permafrost and focus on local results. Oil and gas industries do not share their permafrost results with each other. Human impact from energy industries has cumulatively increased permafrost temperature which further affects their infrastructure. The researchers recommend a new state monitoring system which can be linked to…

A damaged ozone layer – a damaged climate? #Russia #climate

Seeking to reveal the connections between climate change and the destruction of the ozone layer, Dr. Syvorotkin, the leading researcher at the geology department, Moscow State University,  proposed the “Hydrogen” concept and the “Degassing Concept of Global Disasters”.  The core of the ‘hydrogen’ theory is that the ozone layer depletion is caused by the destructive chemical reaction…